‘Dear Diary’: The Power of The Unique Literary Genre

Most of us at some point in our lives have probably kept a diary or journal of some sort, either from a young age detailing school days or later into adolescence and present day. I recently discovered my old diaries from when I was ages 10-13, whilst amusing reliving moments from my younger self, (mainly …

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Feminism and its importance for the future of philosophy

“Philosophy is concerned with the meaning of human life, whether there is any such meaning and whether the human can be made an object of systematic study.” – Riet Turksma. This concern and insight into searching for answers to humanity and the world’s ‘big questions’ which are seemingly unanswerable, makes for interesting discussion which accounts for …

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Review: The Waves by Virginia Woolf

The Waves published in 1931 is Virginia Woolf’s “play-poem” as she called it; a colloquy of six voices, experimenting through the lives of Bernard, Jinny, Louis, Neville, Rhoda and Susan as they evolve, grow and debate with their identities, thoughts and attempts to say “I am this, I am that”. The Waves represents, in a career filled with …

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Satire: The Punch Magazine

Satire, “the use of humour, irony, exaggeration, or ridicule to expose and criticize people's stupidity or vices, particularly in the context of contemporary politics and other topical issues.”  Satire has been used throughout history to express opinions and its significance is vast in providing context for many controversies and important moments in society.  The Punch Magazine was one such …

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Persuasion – a classic re-visited.

“...when pain is over, the remembrance of it often becomes a pleasure.” Volume II, Chapter VIII Austen has often been the source of profound morals which have been weaved seamlessly into her characters and plot lines and Persuasion is no exception. Let’s begin by looking at the title, often overlooked when you start a novel – but a …

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‘Literature explores the conflict between order and chaos’

This is my recent essay comparing John Webster's, 'The Duchess of Malfi' and a selection of Samuel Coleridge's poetry, an interesting comparison nevertheless; but it was a part of my A level English course (OCR exam board, mark 30/30). Both Webster and Coleridge explore the conflict between order and chaos via the symbolism of religion, …

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How literature is vital for the Silver Screen

“The book is better than the movie”.  For decades, readers have reiterated the same phrase when new films are released, “the book is better than the film” the line became a critical reflex in reaction to one mediocre screen version after the other. Arguably movies such as the ‘The Hunger Games’ or the ‘Golden compass’ …

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Journalism in the 21st Century

  SIMON NIXON; THE TIMES AND JOURNALISM IN THE 21STCENTURY On Tuesday afternoon a group of students and I met with Simon Nixon, Chief Leader Writer of The Times; where Simon discussed his career and the role/nature of journalism. Simon is also Chief European Commentator of the Wall Street Journal. He joined the WSJ in 2008 and was …

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To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all.

The saying "be careful what you wish for" genuinely applies to Wilde's novel, 'The Picture of Dorian Gray' in a profound way. When the young Victorian protagonist Dorian Gray is influenced by Lord Henry Wotton’s warning that he only has “a few years in which to live really, perfectly, and fully”. Due to the transiency …

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